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Sussex Country, New Brunswick

Galloway Cows in Sussex, New Brunswick

William Henry Seymour Gamblin (1854-1917) and Ester Ann Kirkpatrick Gamblin (1834-1917)  in 1905

Sussex Country, New Brunswick

William and Joanna Gamblin Original Homestead in 2001

Search for People Where We Live Go to Generations Family Artifacts Maps

Alternative Backgound of William Gamblin and Joanna Seymour
(We welcome comments, especially if you have documentation that supports these conclusions)


Generation No. 1

1. WILLIAM1 GAMBLIN was born 1775 in Wiveliscombe, Somersetshire, England, and died 1851 in English Settlement, Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada. He married JOANNA STANHOPE SEYMOUR August 27, 1810 in Saint George, East Stonehouse, Devon, England. She was born 1787 in England, Earl of Hereford/ Duke of Somerset/ father, and died 1851 in Pearsonville, New Brunswick, Canada.

Notes for WILLIAM GAMBLIN:

William Gamblin was a sailor by profession, a member of England's majestic Navy. He ran away from home and joined the British Navy at age 18 (about 1793) and served between 7 and 8 years (until about 1801). He distinguished himself by his heroic conduct at the Battle of Trafalgar, under the command of Lord Nelson on October 21, 1805. He was one of the men on board the HMS Victory when Lord Nelson was wounded and fell on the tiller-ropes and helped carry Lord Nelson down to his cabin where he died. Later he joined the British Army and served in it between 7 and 8 years (until about 1809).

The Battle of Trafalgar was a naval battle fought on October 21, 1805, by a British fleet and a combined French and Spanish fleet. It is one of the most celebrated naval engagements in European history. The battle took place off Cape Trafalgar on the southern coast of Spain, pitting a British fleet of 27 ships under the command of Admiral Horatio Nelson against a slightly larger combined fleet of France and Spain, commanded by Vice Admiral Pierre Charles de Villeneuve of France. The French admiral was under orders from Napoleon I to slip out of Cádiz, Spain, which was under British blockade, to land troops in southern Italy, where the French were fighting. Leaving port on October 19 and 20, Villeneuve's fleet was intercepted by Nelson's fleet on the morning of October 21. Villeneuve formed his ships into a single battle line, south to north. Nelson, however, surprised his adversary by ordering his ships into two groups, each of which assaulted and cut through the French fleet at right angles, demolishing the battle line; this bold strategy created confusion, giving the British fleet an advantage. The battle began shortly before noon; when it ended, in the late afternoon, some 20 French and Spanish ships had been destroyed or captured, while not a single British vessel was lost. Villeneuve himself was taken prisoner, along with thousands of his sailors. The British suffered about 1500 casualties, among them Admiral Nelson, who was mortally wounded. The overwhelming British victory destroyed Napoleon's plan to invade England and helped secure the supremacy of British naval forces for the rest of the 1800s.

Source: "Trafalgar, Battle of," Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 2000. © 1993-1999 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Copy of William Gamblin's Discharge Papers in June 15, 1812:

To all Officers, Civil and Military, these are to Certify that the Bearer hereof, William Gamblin, Pte. in the 141st Company of the Division aforesaid, born at Wiveliscombe in Somersetshire, aged 37 years, 5 feet 7 inches high, brown hair, sallow complexion, gray eyes, by trade a Blacksmith, hath served Honestly and Faithfully for Seven years Five months and Thirteen days, and being (...Paper all worn out...) He is hereby Discharged from the said Corps having first received all his pay, Arrears of Pay and other just Pretensions, as appears by his Signature at the bottom hereof. Given under my hand and Divisional

Seal, this 15th Day of June, Anno Dom. 1812. Credit Tho. Strickland.

Credit on Ledgers --- 2 " O " 5
Ditto for clothing --- " 
Conduct Money, ---- I " 2 " 9

Received the 15th Day of June, 1812, the above Sum, being thee Whole of my just Pretension. As Witness my Hand, Wm. [his mark] Gambling

Witness present, Benj Wilkenson

Note: The top line -- part of which is missing and the part which is still there but not decipherable starts - - Witness, then the balance is not decipherable. It apparently gave the name of the Division the 141st, Company was in. Under this is a small Scroll, then the wording as above recorded. The witness spelled Great Grandfathers name wrong, having added a G at the end. The line in the body of the Discharge Certificate which is not decipherable, apparently gve the reason for his discharge. The above was copied by me [Harold S. Gamblin] from a photostat copy of the original Discharge Certificate which is in the possession of Mrs. Blanche Webb, a daughter of my Cousin William Gamblin, who lived on the old homestead granted to Great Grandfather William. Signed Harold S. Gamblin

Source: E Mail from Evan Gamblin dated January 31, 2001

William Gamblin married Joanna (Ann) Seymour while in the army in 1810. Joanna Seymour was a daughter of a Nobleman, and a direct descendant from the family of which Jane Seymour, wife of King Henry VIII, was an illustrious member, and whose brother was her progenitor. Joanna Seymour's father and family disinherited and also disowned her, as they considered that she had run away from her family to marry William Gamblin, considered a common sailor, an inferior, and against their wishes and commands. They emigrated to Canada, and finally settled in English Settlement Queens County NB. According to John Smith's Ancestry.com discussion group posting of 11 April 1999, William and Joanna Gamblin came to New Brunswick, Canada, in 1819 from Plymouth Dock, Devonshire, England with children John, William and Sarah. Sarah, the youngest, was born in 1818.

Wiveliscombe Parish Church
Parish Church in Wiveliscombe, Somersetshire, England

William Gamblin was born in Wiveliscombe, Somersetshire England. He was apprentice to a blacksmith, but ran away at 19 years of age and joined the Army with two pals, both of whom were shot soon after. William got through with a slight sabre cut on one cheek and a bullet wound in his ankle. His wife picked the bullet out of his ankle years after in New Brunswick on the old homestead. He also served in the Royal Navy. He served seven years on land and seven years at Sea. He served aboard the Flagship, Victory, with Admiral Nelson at Trafalgar. He came and settled in New Brunswick when it was a wilderness. He married Joanna Seymour. Both were English, and are buried in the Woodland United Church Cemetery, Pearsonville, New Brunswick, Canada.

A 9 March 1892 copy of a Land Grant from 9 November 1829 to William Gamblin, John Bartlett, Thomas Harvey, Alexander Carmichael, James Broad, and William Pearson is in the possession of Ken and Susan Barbi, Annapolis, Maryland, in February 2001.

More About WILLIAM GAMBLIN:

Burial: Woodland United Church Cemetery, Pearsonville, New Brunswick

Military service: Royal Marines

Occupation: Blacksmith

Notes for JOANNA STANHOPE SEYMOUR:

Also known as Ann, and Joannah. Joannah was found in their eldest son's (John) bible spelled this way. She was disowned by her family for marrying William Gamblin, a commoner. Following are the early generations of that family:

Descendants of Sir John Seymour

Generation No. 1

1. SIR JOHN1 SEYMOUR was born WFT Est. 1457-1494, and died WFT Est. 1549-1582. He married MARGARET WENTWORTH. She was born WFT Est. 1465-1494, and died WFT Est. 1549-1584.

Children of SIR SEYMOUR and MARGARET WENTWORTH are:

2. i. EDWARD2 SEYMOR, 1ST DUKE OF SOMERSET, b. 1506; d. 1559.

3. ii. JANE SEYMOUR, QUEEN, b. 1505; d. October 24, 1537.

iii. THOMAS SEYMOR, BARON OF SUDELEY, b. 1549; d. 1549.

Generation No. 2

2. EDWARD2 SEYMOR, 1ST DUKE OF SOMERSET (SIR JOHN1 SEYMOUR) was born 1506, and died 1559. He married (1) ANNE STANHOPE March 9, 1534, daughter of EDWARD STANHOPE and ELIZABETH BOURCHIER. She was born WFT Est. 1501-1520, and died April 16, 1587. He married (2) UNKNOWN WIFE 1553.

More About ANNE STANHOPE:

Burial: Westminster Abbey, London, England

Children of EDWARD SEYMOR and ANNE STANHOPE are:

4. i. EDWARD3 SEYMOUR, 1ST EARL OF HERTFORD, b. May 22, 1539; d. 1612.

ii. ANNE SEYMOUR.

iii. HENRY SEYMOUR.

iv. SON SEYMOUR, LORD BEAUCHAMP.

Children of EDWARD SEYMOR and UNKNOWN WIFE are:

v. JOHN3 SEYMOR, b. 1553; d. April 26, 1553.

vi. EDWARD SEYMOR, d. 1602.

3. JANE2 SEYMOUR, QUEEN (SIR JOHN1) was born 1505, and died October 24, 1537. She married HENRY VIII KING OF ENGLAND May 30, 1536 in Whitehall, son of HENRY ENGLAND and ELIZABETH YORK. He was born June 28, 1491 in Greenwich, and died May 19, 1547 in Palace of Westminster.

Notes for JANE SEYMOUR, QUEEN:

Seymour, Jane (1509?-37), queen consort of England (1536-37) as the third wife of King Henry VIII. The sister of Edward Seymour, and probably born in Wiltshire, she served as a lady in waiting to Catherine of Aragón and later to Anne Boleyn, the first two wives of Henry. Less than two weeks after the execution of Anne Boleyn (1536), Jane privately married the king. She died on October 24, 1537, 12 days after the birth of her son, Edward, Henry's only male heir, later King Edward VI of England.

"Seymour, Jane," Microsoft(R) Encarta(R) 98 Encyclopedia. (c) 1993-1997 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Child of JANE SEYMOUR and HENRY ENGLAND is:

i. EDWARD3 VI, b. 1537; d. 1553.

Notes for EDWARD VI:

Edward VI (1537-53), king of England and Ireland (1547-53), the last in the male line of the house of Tudor.

Edward was born at Hampton Court on October 12, 1537, the only son of Henry VIII and Jane Seymour, his third wife. He succeeded to the throne on the death of his father early in 1547. On his accession, his maternal uncle, Edward Seymour, 1st earl of Hertford, was named Lord Protector and duke of Somerset. In 1547 the Protector, in Edward's name, invaded Scotland, using as a pretext an alleged violation by the Scots of an agreement to give Mary, queen of Scots, in marriage to Edward. The English forces defeated the Scots at Pinkie in September of that year.

Both Edward and the Protector strongly favored the principle of the Reformation and did much to establish Protestantism in England. The body of edicts known as the Six Articles, enacted in the reign of Henry VIII, was repealed, and a new service book, the first Book of Common Prayer, was imposed in 1549. Although it was moderate in its approach, it was strongly opposed by Roman Catholics and stirred some uprisings. It subsequently, however, came into general use in the Anglican church.

In 1549 Somerset's attempt to help poor peasants by forbidding enclosure was thwarted by rich landowners, with the result that the peasants revolted. The opportunity was used by John Dudley, later duke of Northumberland, to remove Somerset from power. Edward was thereafter virtually controlled by Dudley, who in 1552 persuaded him to have Somerset executed for treason. The king became seriously ill of tuberculosis the year after. Shortly before Edward's death at Greenwich on July 6, 1553, Dudley induced him to sign a will depriving his half sisters, who later ruled as Mary I and Elizabeth I, of their claim to the royal succession. The right of succession then fell to Lady Jane Grey, who had married Dudley's son, but she was deposed by Mary a few days later.

"Edward VI," Microsoft(R) Encarta(R) 98 Encyclopedia. (c) 1993-1997 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved..

Generation No. 3

4. EDWARD3 SEYMOUR, 1ST EARL OF HERTFORD (EDWARD2 SEYMOR, 1ST DUKE OF SOMERSET, SIR JOHN1 SEYMOUR) was born May 22, 1539, and died 1612.

Child of EDWARD SEYMOUR, 1ST EARL OF HERTFORD is:

i. LINK4 SEYMOUR.

Notes for LINK SEYMOUR:

This link connects Sir Edward Seymour to Joanna Seymour. It probably represents 4 -6 missing generations.

It comes from research performed in July 1950 by Col Frederick H. Mills who compiled a "history of the Smalls and Gamblins." This information came to Ken and Susan Barbi as copies of a 6 page document (passed through Thelma Gamblin Fay in 1998) that Col Mills typed and included Family Group Records that were filled out from source information found in New Brunswick, Canada.

Col Frederick H. Mills married Alice Lillian Small (Apr 7, 1895 - Unknown) on July 8, 1922. They had a daughter Alberta Lillian Mills born on June 13, 1928.

This is the only documentation of this connection

More About JOANNA STANHOPE SEYMOUR:

Burial: Woodland United Church Cemetery, Pearsonville, New Brunswick

 

Children of WILLIAM GAMBLIN and JOANNA SEYMOUR are:

i. JOHN2 GAMBLIN, was born 12 Sep 1811 in Stoke Damerel, Devon, England, and died Aft. 1881. He married ANN HALL 14 Apr 1834 in English Settlement, Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada, daughter of GEORGE HALL and SARAH MOODY. She was born 20 Oct 1803 in West Stockworth, Nottingham County, England, and died Bet. 1881 - 1891 in New Brunswick, Canada.

Notes for ANN HALL:
Ann "Nancy" HALL (George1) b. 20 October, 1803, West Stockworth, bapt. 1 November, 1803, Misterton parish, Nottinghamshire, England; d. 1881-1891; m1. c1828; to William SARGESON, son of Robert and Elizabeth Sargeson; b. 1805, England; d. 1831-1835. Ann (Hall) Sargeson m2. 14 April, 1835, English Settlement, Kings County, NB, witnesses - William Chamberlain & John Bartlett; to John GAMBLIN, son of William Gamblin and Johanna Seymour; b. 12 September, 1811, Plymouth, Devon, England; d. after 1881

Issue from William Sargeson:

i. George Parker Sargeson, b. 1828, probably English Settlement, Johnston parish, Queens County, NB.

ii. Alice "Elsie" Sargeson, b. 1830, probably English Settlement, Johnston parish, Queens County, NB.

iii. Robert Sargeson, b. 1832, probably English Settlement, Johnston parish, Queens County, NB.
Source: Greg Haley, May 2, 2008

More About JOHN GAMBLIN and ANN HALL:
Marriage: 14 Apr 1834, English Settlement, Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada

Children of JOHN GAMBLIN and ANN HALL are:

i. WILLIAM HENRY SEYMOUR3 GAMBLIN, b. 03 Jan 1836, Pearsonville, New Brunswick, Canada; d. 27 Jan 1907.
ii. SAMUEL JAMES GAMBLIN, b. 24 Oct 1837, Pearsonville, New Brunswick, Canada; d. 30 Oct 1895, Collina, Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada.
iii. JOHN GAMBLIN, b. 06 Sep 1839, Pearsonville, New Brunswick, Canada; d. Unknown.
iv. CHARLES SEYMOUR GAMBLIN, b. 30 Sep 1841, Pearsonville, New Brunswick, Canada; d. 20 Feb 1903.
v. MOODY GAMBLIN, b. 15 Nov 1843, Pearsonville, New Brunswick, Canada; d. 14 May 1847.

Source: Greg Haley

ii. JOANNA ELIZABETH GAMBLIN, b. Bef. 03 Apr 1814, Stoke Damerel, Devon, England; d. Bef. 22 Oct 1815

More About JOANNA ELIZABETH GAMBLIN

Baptism:  3 Apr 1814, Stoke Damerel Parish
Burial:  22 Oct 1815, Stoke Damerel Parish

Source:  Greg Haley

iii. WILLIAM HENRY SEYMOUR GAMBLIN, b. 1816, Plymouth, England.

Notes for WILLIAM HENRY SEYMOUR GAMBLIN:

Left his family and is believed to have moved to the USA taking up the name Seymour.

Source: Tressa Williams

iv. SARAH GAMBLIN, b. 1818, England; m. REV. JAMES NICHERSON, January 24, 1836.

v. JAMES ROBERT GAMBLIN, b. October 6, 1821, Studholm, Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada; d. October 9, 1891, Marrtown, Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada; m. ELIZABETH ANN ROWLEY, October 5, 1843, Johnston, New Brunswick, Canada; b. December 22, 1825, County Fermanagh, Ireland; d. September 5, 1913, Marrtown, Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada.

Notes for JAMES ROBERT GAMBLIN:

First boy baby born in English Settlement on October 6, 1821.

More About JAMES ROBERT GAMBLIN:

Burial: Baptist Church Cemetery, Snider Mountain, New Brunswick

Notes for ELIZABETH ANN ROWLEY:

Elizabeth Roley came to Canada with her parents when she was six years old. They lived in Saint John five years. Her father was a weaver by trade, in Ireland. It is understood that the family first went to Australia to live but did not like it there and proceeded to Canada to make their home.

More About ELIZABETH ANN ROWLEY:

Burial: Baptist Church Cemetery, Snider Mountain, New Brunswick

vi. CAROLINE GAMBLIN, b. April 18, 1824, Pearsonville, New Brunswick, Canada; d. October 24, 1893; m. JOHN SOPER, November 27, 1843; b. March 15, 1820, London, England; d. June 10, 1896.

More About CAROLINE GAMBLIN:

Burial: Baptist Church Cemetery, Snider Mountain, New Brunswick

Notes for JOHN SOPER:

John Soper was a wheelwright by trade and lived in Saint John, becoming a freeman of the city on April 25, 1855. He was also a member of the Wesleyan Methodist Society. John was given a Crown grant No. 14 in the Parish of Brunswick, County of Queens. This land adjoined that of Samuel Gamblin. He sold his land, but in 1865 borrowed 100 pounds from William Johnson, who later married his daughter Joanna, and bought land on Snider Mountain. In later years, after his wife died, he gave this land to his son, John Alexander McCurdy Soper, to care for him in his old age. Son, John moved to Saint John, later to Lower Coverdale, where his father died. The property on Snider Mountain was sold to James Robert Soper for $1600. ( ?16.00) He later sold it and moved to Moncton.

More About JOHN SOPER:

Burial: Baptist Church Cemetery, Snider Mountain, New Brunswick

vii. GEORGE A. MCCALLISTER GAMBLIN, b. 1826, English Settlement (Highfield), Queens Co, New Brunswick; d. May 8, 1848.

Notes for GEORGE A. MCCALLISTER GAMBLIN:

His grave stone is broken.

Source: Tressa Williams

More About GEORGE A. MCCALLISTER GAMBLIN:

Burial: Woodland United Church Cemetery, Pearsonville, New Brunswick

Cause of Death: Drowning

viii. SAMUEL MICHAEL GAMBLIN, b. May 17, 1830, Pearsonville, New Brunswick, Canada; d. December 28, 1897, Pearsonville, New Brunswick, Canada; m. ESTHER ANN KIRKPATRICK, January 14, 1851, Pearsonville, New Brunswick, Canada; b. February 4, 1834, Campbell Settlement,York County, New Brunswick; d. May 31, 1917, Pearsonville, New Brunswick, Canada.

Notes for SAMUEL MICHAEL GAMBLIN:

Samuel is buried in Woodland United Church Cemetery in Pearsonville, NB.

 

Following is the text of the original land grant in New Brunswick, Canada, to Samuel M. Gamblin Registered June 27, 1855. The original land grant is in the possession of Ken and Susan Barbi, Annapolis, Maryland, in February 2001. It is also available through the New Brunswick Provincial Archives at the Bonar Law-Bennett Building, 23 Dineen Drive, UNB Campus, Fredericton, NB, (506) 453-2111. It is located in Volume: 46, page, Grant number 7006, New Brunswick registration date: 1855/06/27; Accompanying plan: y; Acreage: 100 acres; Place and County: Johnston, Queens County.

New Brunswick.

Victoria, by the Grace of GOD, of the United Kingdom of Great Britian and Ireland, Queen, Defender of the Faith. To all to whom these Presents shall come, Greeting: Know Ye, that We, of Our special Grace, certain knowledge, and mere motion, have given and granted, and We do by these Presents for Us, Our Heirs and Successors, give and grant unto Samuel M. Gamblin, his Heirs and Assigns, a Tract of Land situate in the Parish of Johnston in the County of Queens in Our Province of New Brunswick, and bounded as follows, to-wit: Beginning at a Maple tree standing on the easterly side of a reserved Road in the northwesterly angle of lot number fifteen in Hock three. Thence running by the Magnet of the year one Thousand eight hundred and fifty four North three degrees East along said side of said reserved Road, fifty chains, thence South eighty seven degrees East twenty chains to a spruce tree thence South three degrees west fifty chains to a post, and thence North eighty seven degrees west twenty chains to the place of beginning, containing one hundred acres, more or less, distinguished as lot number thirty five in Hock three, and also particularly described and marked on the Plot or Plan of Survey hereunto annexed; together with all profits, commodities, hereditaments and appurtenances whatsoever thereunto belonging or in any wise appertaining; except and reserved, nevertheless, out of this present Grant to Us, Our Heirs and Successors, all Coals, and also all Gold and Silver, and other Mines and Minerals; TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the said tract of Land, and all and singular the Premises hereby granted, with their appurtenances, (exept before excepted) unto the said Samuel M. Gamblin his Heirs and Assigns, FOR EVER: Provided always, and this present Grant is upon condition, that the same Grant be registered in the Secretary's Office of Our said Province of New Brunswick, to which Registry shall be attached a duplicate of the Plan hereunto annexed.

Given under the Great Seal of Our Province of New Brunswick. WITNESS Our trusty and well beloved The Honorable John Henry Thomas Manners Sutton, Our Lieutenant Governor and Commander in Chief of Our said Province, at Fredericton, the Twenty sixth day of June in the Year of Our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty five and in the Nineteenth Year of Our Reign.

BY HIS EXCELLENCY'S COMMAND A. L. Tilley

No. 7006 Registered the 27th day of June 1855 A. L. Tilley

More About SAMUEL MICHAEL GAMBLIN:

Burial: Woodland United Church Cemetery, Pearsonville, New Brunswick

Notes for ESTHER ANN KIRKPATRICK:

She was Irish. Buried in the Woodland United Church Cemetery in Pearsonville , NB.

More About ESTHER ANN KIRKPATRICK:

Burial: Woodland United Church Cemetery, Pearsonville, New Brunswick

Source: Ken and Susan Barbi, and Tressa Williams Genealogical Data

Canadian Contact
Evan R. Gamblin
Phone 613.257.5023
 

United States Contact
Ken and Susan Barbi
Phone 410.757.5044

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This page last updated on Saturday, April 04, 2015